Country California

Country music. Seriously.

This Week in Country Music History

2009 – Country California publishes another gripping edition of This Week in Country Music History.

2006 – Former Alabama lead singer Randy Owen attends his first concert as a ticket-holder: Kenny Chesney at BJCC Arena in Birmingham, Alabama. Owen is ejected after screaming for “Free Bird” one too many times.

1992 – Warner Bros. releases Travis Tritt’s third album, T-R-O-U-B-L-E. Two-year-old Taylor Swift has her first boy t-r-o-u-b-l-e when a daycare friend accuses her of having a big fanny.

1983 – Crystal Gayle and husband-manager Bill Gatzimos have their first baby, Katherine Claire. It’s an unusual delivery in that baby Katherine’s six-foot-long train of hair precedes her tiny infant body out of the womb.

1979 – The Charlie Daniels Band celebrates the only gold single of its career, “The Devil Went Down To Georgia.” Despite delivering the better fiddle solo, the devil receives none of the proceeds. Seeking vengeance, he unleashes Urban Cowboy on the country music world the following year.

1974 – David Allan Coe records the perfect country-and-western song, “You Never Even Call Me By My Name,” at Nashville’s Columbia Studio A. The form of payment offered to participating studio musicians? Not getting beat up by David Allan Coe.

1973 – Kris Kristofferson marries Rita Coolidge. Kristofferson’s wedding vows, which run some 36 minutes long, are later set to music and released as the polarizing political album Third World Warrior (1990).

1961 – Patsy Cline’s “Crazy” and Jimmy Dean’s “Big Bad John” are recorded at the Bradley Film & Recording Studio in Nashville on separate days. Dean’s session is the longer of the two, as he insists that everyone stop every hour on the hour to enjoy delicious sausage sandwiches.

1950 – Hank Snow hits the top of the Billboard country charts with “I’m Movin’ On,” which ironically goes nowhere for the next 20 weeks (a record-setting stay at the top of the charts). Known around Nashville as big Snow fans, honky tonk outfit Rascal Flatts take their cover of “I’m Movin’ On” all the way to #4 in 2002.

1939 – Singer-songwriter Billy Joe Shaver comes out shooting in Corsicana, Texas.

1935 – Patsy Montana records “I Want to Be A Cowboy’s Sweetheart,” which becomes the first record by a woman in country music to pass the million mark in sales. Decades later, the Montana family again takes the country music world by storm when great-granddaughter Hannah embarks on her own singing career.

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3 Comments

  1. WE JUST GOT BACK FROM MEMPHIS TENN AND NASHVILLE WE TOURED ALL OVER NASHVILLE TOOK A TOUR OF THE RYMEN AUDATORUM & COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME & GRAND OLE OPERY TOOK A TOUR SAW THE GRAND OLE OPERY SAW LITTLE JIMMY DICKIN’S & JEAN SHEPARD THA WAS A TREAT THEY SING JUST LIKE THEY DID WHEN THEY WERE YOUNGER STILL LOOK THE SAME BUT A LITTLE OLDER THEY SOUND GRATE THOW THERE VOICES ARE SILL THE SAME WE ENJOYED IT ALOT THEY PUT ON A GRATE SHOW GOD BLESS THEM KEEP THEM WELL AND SAFE AMEN JESUS

  2. I LOVE THIS FEATURE 1979 WAS GRATE

Trackbacks

  1. Jack Ingram Sets Sights On Record; Smash Mouth Crossover; Patty Griffin’s Gospel | The 9513

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