Scotty McCreery Goes Big; Black Lillies Set Opry Debut; Tom T. Hall Slideshow and “Making of” Featurette

  
  • Scotty McCreery’s “I Love You This Big” showed up at #32 on the Billboard Country Songs chart, representing the best first-week showing for a debut single by a new artist in more than 20 years. Well, I guess that about does it, guys. Country music is over.
  • Whew, maybe not. Just in the nick of time, the latest episode of Saving Country Music Radio features Dale Watson, JB Beverley & the Wayward Drifters, Jerry Reed, Pokey LaFarge, and plenty of John Hartford. Listen or download here.
  • Saving Country Music also points out that Bloodworth, the film starring Kris Kristofferson, Dwight Yoakam, and Hank Williams III that debuted in (very) select theaters mere days ago, is already available for on-demand viewing through Amazon Instant Video. The jury’s still out on whether it’s any good.
  • My Kind of Country’s Occasional Hope reviewed Diamond Rio’s Grammy-winning gospel album The Reason. Here’s the CliffsNotes version: fundamentally misjudged, deeply disappointing, flat and generic, over-produced, almost unlistenable, even less listenable. Final grade? D.
  • Country Universe wants to know a song you used to hate but now don’t. A few different Carrie Underwood songs have already been mentioned in the comments. Ben Foster likes “Undo It,” which is why there won’t be any links from the 1-to-10 Country Music Review today.
  • Just kidding. Ben gave high marks to Glen Templeton’s single “I Could Be the One,” complimenting it for “[sounding] this catchy while still possessing organically-layered lyrics that can hold up under scrutiny.”
  • Am I the only one who missed Jim Malec’s lengthy Taylor Swift feature for American Songwriter that was published back at the beginning of the month? Either way, here it is. Swift on cowriting:

    I’ve experienced almost every kind of writing session that you can experience: The kind where you try and write a song for seven hours, and you never end up finishing it. The kind where you write a song in 30 minutes. The kind where you’re writing with someone who clearly doesn’t take you seriously. Or the kind where you’re writing with someone who just gets you and gets what you want to say. But nowhere in that process – even during the bad or harder experiences I’ve had – did I ever sit there and say, ‘I’m at a disadvantage because I’m young. I’m at a disadvantage because I’m a girl. I’m at a disadvantage, I’m entitled, I deserve more respect.’ I have always been respectful of every situation that I’ve been in with other songwriters because I feel like you learn something from every experience – even the bad ones. If you have a writing session where someone doesn’t take you seriously and kinda scoffs at your ideas, you can make a note to self: ‘Never do that to someone else’. You learn something from everything that you go through. I know that, looking back, I learned something from every single experience that I had writing on Music Row.

  • Another one I missed: Writing for NPR, Geoffrey Himes wonders if Cajun string bands might be the next big roots music trend among young folks:

    If those kids will embrace Mumford & Sons and The Avett Brothers — as well as related bands like Old Crow Medicine Show, Uncle Earl, The Wailin’ Jennys and Carolina Chocolate Drops — might they also embrace the new wave of Cajun bands that have emerged around Lafayette, La.? After all, bands such as the Pine Leaf Boys, Cedric Watson & Bijou Creole, the Lost Bayou Ramblers, Feufollet and the Red Stick Ramblers play their string-band instruments with the same contagious momentum as their better-known counterparts.

  • The Black Lillies, whose “Three in the Mornin'” we selected as a Prime Cut, will make their Grand Ole Opry debut on June 17, becoming the first independent band from the Knoxville area to be so honored.
  • Jesse Dayton (check out “Lately I’ve Let Things Slide”) and Matt Nathanson on Daytrotter.
  • Charitybuzz has a bunch of country music stuff up for auction (to raise money for charities, as you might surmise). Interesting to see what’s available and for how much, even if you don’t have $550 for a guitar signed by Carrie Underwood or a spare $1,750 for a private dinner with John Rich. (I hear he’ll smash a beer bottle against your face for an extra $200.)
  • A couple cool just-posted Youtube videos concerning that new Tom T. Hall tribute album I won’t stop mentioning: a 10-minute “making of the album” feature and a 12-minute Fox Hollow photo slideshow shown at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum release event.
  • Have a nice Memorial Day. Don’t forget what it’s all about. (No, not the mullet.)

Comments

  1. says

    What I’ve heard of I Love: Tom T Hall’s Songs of Fox Hollow sounds killer, but I’m waiting until I’m in Nashville tomorrow and can pick up a physical copy at Ernest Tubb’s before I buy it. Any album that combines Tom T Hall, Buddy Miller, Jim Lauderdale, Patty Griffin and Duane Eddy is well worth buying.

  2. says

    I didn’t say “like.” I said “no longer” hate :)

    First “Honey Bee,” and now “I Love You This Big”? Apparently, setting new chart records requires very little brain function.

  3. PN says

    I didn’t like that last sentence that the columnist said about Scotty McCreary. I think that writer’s uncomfortable that Scotty came off from TV rather than the hard way of getting a record deal. He did some very good peformances on American Idol. I hope he doesn’t sound like Josh Turner on his album and has his own vocal style with his deep voice.

  4. idlewildsouth says

    Watched Bloodworth today. Pretty decent. A lot of good obscure music, pretty solid acting across the board. If you’re into any of the names listed, its a fun watch.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>